Coffee Rhetoric: misogyny
Showing posts with label misogyny. Show all posts
Showing posts with label misogyny. Show all posts

June 03, 2017

Tuxedos, Prom Gowns, & Guns

Dads, stop pointing guns at your daughters’ prom dates 


Remember preparing for prom? Taking an entire afternoon to sit in a nail or hair salon or fuss over last minute alterations and pick up coordinating corsages and boutonnieres, before putting your look together and posing for customary photos in the front yard, seemed to be the wave back in some of our heyday.

These days, with the help of supportive family and willing friends, teenagers are pulling out all the stops for the prom. From staging elaborate entrances to creating customized gowns that make fashion-forward or political statements, prom has become a wonderfully garish display of creativity, stunts, and shows fit for social media virality.

There’s one trend, however, that has been cropping up of late that adds an air of gloom to the fun grandstanding we’ve come to enjoy seeing on social media during prom season: teenage girls posing in prom pictures with their shotgun-wielding fathers pointing their weapons at apprehensive-looking dates. Because apparently, when the patriarchy isn’t fastening purity rings to their daughters’ fingers via eerie formal ceremonies, they call themselves sending an intimidating message to potential male suitors in a mendacious attempt to protect their teenage daughters’ chastity; a stance that comes across as little more than chauvinist posturing considering many of them upheld (and still partake in, when not within eye-shot of their precocious daughters) the very lecherous, predatory, and toxic masculinity they’re trying to shield their daughters from before being slapped with the pangs of fathering girls.

November 10, 2014

Comedy Fail: Artie Lange, Rape & Misogynoir as Cheap Humor

Here we are again...

As the world turns, it continues to be open season on black women’s person-hood and the racially charged or sexist invective comes from all directions, to the tune of crickets, save for the droves of other black women (and a smattering of allies) denouncing the abuse. This time the offender is another shitty male comic who opted for the lazy use of shock humor in the form of rape, slavery and racio-misogyny, for cheap guffaws and fist bumps.


April 05, 2013

My Petition: My Black Feminism is Here to Stay

My womanhood and rights are not up for debate

I've been reading some highly-charged,  racio-misogyny and anti-Black woman rants about how feminism (or Womanism) is supposedly ruining society and the black community, and is to blame for the contentious relationship between black men and women. Some folks seem to think that if (black) women would just shut up and stop speaking out against issues like reproductive rights, sexism, sexual harassment, street harassment, abuse and sexual assault we would all get along swimmingly, because women are meant to be seen and not heard, am I right? 

Contrary to popular (and misinformed) belief, feminists don’t operate as a monolith. The majority of us don't live to emasculate or browbeat men, nor are we opposed to feminine sensibilities, sex, marriage, family, or whatever we supposedly abhor in the linear and limited thinking and misunderstanding about gender equality.

Some people seem to harbor the convoluted, and cartoonish, idea that feminists are fervent misandrists who hate everything and everybody… perhaps because they themselves are averse to evolving beyond the status quo of patriarchy. Believing the “Feminazis are evil, man-hating feminazis!” narrative makes it easy for anti-feminists to continue espousing patriarchal propaganda, and to believe they shouldn’t be held accountable for how they (mis)treat and marginalize women and young girls; so they can have reasons to keep their foot firmly rooted on my neck, enact epistemic violence, and rationalize dangerous arguments in support of “legitimate rape”; so they can continue to uphold gender inequities and maintain a stronghold on women’s vaginas. And while some women are well within their right to not be labeled as a feminist (or Womanist), and will gladly uphold patriarchy as a way to score brownie points, ‘other’ themselves, or seek favor with  misogynists, they conveniently forget that they reap the benefits that feminists fight to secure. Good luck with pandering though, ladies.


March 27, 2013

On Rick Ross and his Irresponsible Endorsement of Rape & Non-Consent

Cross-post from Intersection of Madness & Reality ... 


Rick Ross is a Rapist and "You Ain't Even Know It" 

by Rippa


I'm no fan of Rick Ross at all. The one-time corrections officer turned fake drug-dealer, and now self-proclaimed "Bawse," of the hip hop industry has always rubbed me the wrong way. Yes, Rick Ross' is to hip hop what Manti Te'o's girlfriend was to him before she died: he's fake. But that's not why I'm writing about Ricky Rozay today. In fact, if anything, Rick Ross has shown us what I think to be his truest colors to date.
On the new song “U.O.E.N.O.” (you ain’t even know it) by Rocko, William Leonard Roberts II let's the ladies know in no uncertain terms. what he thinks about them. In his verse, the would-be Barry White of the rap game says “Put molly all in her champagne, she ain’t even know it, I took her home and I enjoyed that, she ain’t even know it.”

October 27, 2012

Don't Speak: Women Don't Have to Smile or Say 'Hi' on Command



Pic from: stoptellingwomentosmile.com
Recently on Tumblr, I shared an experience I had while out-and-about, that left me feeling a bit taken aback, because it ceases to amaze me how men go about exerting dominance and upholding patriarchy in shared spaces, towards women they don't know. And in doing so, will say the most crude things and make the most dictatorial demands, as if it’s their due. 

September 25, 2012

Black Hurricane Isaac Worker Spit on and Assaulted by Racist



2010 and 2011 were years that saw Black women being put under intense scrutiny. Studies and shoddily collected data that seemed based on biases and tropes about Black female pathology, outlined why a high percentage of us are single, why we’re scientifically uglier than non-Black women,  how disgusting or unappealing our bodies and attitudes supposedly are compared to our White counterparts, how horrible it is to be a Black unwed mother, and how we’re somehow the key to ending military suicides.  And while 2012 didn’t really take the magnifying glass off Black women, it definitely seemed to mark a growing level of [oft-times inadequately reported] violence and infractions against us.