Coffee Rhetoric: Slavery
Showing posts with label Slavery. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Slavery. Show all posts

May 02, 2013

'Black Twitter' Takes on #BlackPrivilege

Written for and orig. published on Intersection of Madness and Reality


When racism rears its ugly head on social media, leave it to ‘Black Twitter’ to clap-back and upend rhetoric meant to denigrate black folks, and turn it into a clever and teachable moment steeped in the type of sardonic satire meant to make perpetrators of said racial insensitivity, feel stupid for having ever tried.

Last week, the #BlackPrivilege hash-tag gained momentum on Twitter, reportedly created as a response to the discovery of a (neglected?) tumblr blog and, perhaps, just being plain tired of having to ward off cries of "reverse-racism" whenever black people speak out loud about the lived experiences and daily microaggressions many of us have to navigate . “This Is Black Privilege” ... an anonymous tumblr blog comprised of a jumble of murky, awkwardly written non-facts that seem as if they were culled from the library stacks of Ignoramus University.

March 23, 2013

Film Review: Owen 'Alik Shahadah's '500 Years Later'




Looking for something interesting to watch this weekend or during the month of February? 

Filmmaker Owen 'Alik Shahadah's 2005 documentary 500 Years Later is a valuable exploration and dissection of racial politics, as it affects those of the African Diaspora. Written by MK Asante and directed by Shahadah, this documentary presents a global perspective on the effects of colonialism, slavery, and the need for proper education on and agency over African and Black history and dialogue.

According to the official synopsis... 
"500 Years Later explores the tragic legacy of the forced migration of untold thousands of Africans from their homeland and the unique c0 challenges that have resulted from this displacement. Through penetrating interviews with scholars and laypeople alike — and ranging from the United States to London to Barbados — this unflinching documentary sheds new light on the problems of racial inequalities, poverty and oppression."