Coffee Rhetoric: Ousmane Sembène
Showing posts with label Ousmane Sembène. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Ousmane Sembène. Show all posts

June 13, 2014

Must Watch - Five Foreign Films You May Have Missed on Netflix or Hulu

I quite enjoy my Roku streaming device and am a self-professed film nerd. I'm also an avid watcher of streamed movies: whether they're cult classics, horror, Grindhouse, obscure arthouse, documentaries, or TV series – especially when they're offered through Netflix, HULU Plus, and Film Movement; so I've come to appreciate reading compiled ‘What to Watch on Netflix’ lists, because I’m often made privy to gems I may overlook while perusing the streamed offerings.

To note, 
I've been blogging for a long time, and would sometimes make film suggestions or write reviews of my own… pre-streaming, of course. I miss weighing-in and sharing what I've watched, and have enjoyed some really interesting films of late, in addition to revisiting some old favorites. So without further ado, I've been prompted to offer a list of suggested films, of my own, starting with foreign films. 
Here is a list of 5 must-watch foreign films via Netflix Instant Watch, Hulu, or other... 

August 15, 2011

Ousmane Sembène's 'Black Girl'

Since I'm one of the people that have little to no desire to see The Help and tried (to no avail) to finish Kathryn Stockett's book, I decided to re-visit a 1966 French classic from the New Wave era, called La Noire de... (or Black Girl). Written and directed by Senegalese filmmaker and auteur Ousmane Sembène (christened the Father of African film). 

La Noire de...charts the tragic story of Diouana, a young woman from Dakar who moves to Antibes, France to work for the wealthy French couple she nannied for during their time in Dakar. Excited, Diouana looks forward to taking in the sites of the Riviera and living a cosmopolitan life as she cares for her young charges, however, upon her arrival to Antibes she finds that her mercurial mistress has other plans for her... Diouana is treated harshly (much to the indifference of the man of the house) like a servant; not allowed to leave the confines of the apartment or wear any of the nicer clothes she brought with her. She's not paid in a timely fashion either. Aware of her exploitation in Antibes, a defiant Diouana starts to withdraw and becomes increasingly overwhelmed by homesickness and despair. 

Black Girl definitely touches on the effects of colonialism, post-colonialism, and racism within the confines of Europe and Africa. During one scene Diouana is asked to cook a traditional Senegalese dish for her employers- (she mentally notes that she never had to cook for them when she worked as their nanny in Dakar)- and their affluent friends during a gathering. They openly discuss her exoticism. One of the men excitedly jumps up and demands a kiss, as he's "never kissed a Black girl before." 
This film is subtle and the black and white cinematography is simple; yet La Noire de... is hauntingly tragic in its message, commands attention, and is definitely still relevant as it charts the devastating toll anti-Blackness, postcolonialism, and misogynoir takes mentally, emotionally, and physically.