Coffee Rhetoric: Netflix
Showing posts with label Netflix. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Netflix. Show all posts

June 13, 2014

Must Watch - Five Foreign Films You May Have Missed on Netflix or Hulu

I quite enjoy my Roku streaming device and am a self-professed film nerd. I'm also an avid watcher of streamed movies: whether they're cult classics, horror, Grindhouse, obscure arthouse, documentaries, or TV series – especially when they're offered through Netflix, HULU Plus, and Film Movement; so I've come to appreciate reading compiled ‘What to Watch on Netflix’ lists, because I’m often made privy to gems I may overlook while perusing the streamed offerings.

To note, 
I've been blogging for a long time, and would sometimes make film suggestions or write reviews of my own… pre-streaming, of course. I miss weighing-in and sharing what I've watched, and have enjoyed some really interesting films of late, in addition to revisiting some old favorites. So without further ado, I've been prompted to offer a list of suggested films, of my own, starting with foreign films. 
Here is a list of 5 must-watch foreign films via Netflix Instant Watch, Hulu, or other... 

March 02, 2013

'Dreams of a Life'- The Complex Story of Joyce Carol Vincent


A while back I came across a “semi-documentary”, written and directed by English filmmaker Carol Morley, called Dreams of a Life.  The haunting and speculative 2011 film attempts to piece together the life of 38-year old Londoner, Joyce Carol Vincent. A beautiful aspiring singer and seemingly gregarious woman of Indo-Caribbean and Afro-Caribbean extraction, Vincent’s decomposed body was found in her North London bedsit flat; having apparently died in late 2003, her remains went undiscovered for three years despite neighbors noticing the smell of decomposition emanating from her apartment. 

I recall reading about Joyce some years ago and feeling somewhat bothered by the few fleeting details reported by the media about her; never able to recall reading anything else substantive about her personal life, how she died, or even a picture of her. Her story, or lack thereof, more-or-less dwindled and disappeared from the media. Before watching Dreams of a Life, I thought Joyce’s story was cut-and-dry, and that there was nothing more to be told, beyond that of the sad life of a friendless woman with no family, who died alone and unaccounted for. I never imagined, after all of this time, this posthumous follow-up of Joyce's life would present a story far more compelling than I could have ever imagined.