Coffee Rhetoric: Coffee Buzz: A.R.T. - Going Against Reality's Terms

September 16, 2012

Coffee Buzz: A.R.T. - Going Against Reality's Terms



Considering it's such a small state, Connecticut is brimming with a wide array of artists from the myriad of creative disciplines, which includes Hip-Hop and rap. While most folks scattered across the northeast may consider CT’s rap scene to be nothing more than a fleeting fantasy for inexperienced wannabes, I surmise, that charting a path from the Nutmeg state to universal stardom gives up-and-coming rappers and Hip-Hop artists quite the advantage. Being an underdog that’s often brushed off by its larger than life New York cousins induces a certain degree of famine . . . and that intense hunger has produced an impressive list of lyricists, spoke-word performers, and beat makers, looking to make their mark on the Hip-Hop scene.  Greg “A.R.T.” Moore is among them. 


Born and raised in the Bloomfield and Hartford areas of Connecticut, A.R.T. [an acronym for Against Reality's Terms] has been writing music for a number of years, but it wasn't until the last couple that he took a more proactive stance towards his Hip-Hop career; booking gigs at popular venues around Hartford and the tri-state area, including various poetry showcases, Up or On the Rocks bar, Cloud 9 and Webster Hall in NYC. At once thoughtful and unapologetically introspective [a rarity in this current rap climate], A.R.T.‘s mission is to entertain as well as to inform. … 
I started writing raps because I thought it was just fun trying to put words together to rhyme. My first raps were about things like girls and basketball. I was young then, about 12 or 13. It wasn't until I got older that I realized that I could send a message through my words. Or even use writing rhymes as a source of refuge. I think a lot, probably even too much at times. Writing raps was a creative outlet to get those thoughts, ideas, and feelings out.” He said.
And as for the unique moniker he christened himself with; after considering several different names (some of which he’s loath to share), “A.R.T.”  provided a far more apt metaphor  for everything the artist stands for…
I wanted to have a name that represents me, what I plan to do musically and also something that people can also relate to or use in their lives as well.” said the rapper. “I used to draw a lot when I was young. That's where the idea of using "art" came from. But I wanted it to mean more. I think in a lot of ways, I am different than a lot of people. Just the way I think and my outlook on life, overall, I feel is different and I want my music to represent that feeling. The phrase "Against Reality's Terms" is a way of life. It's something that anyone can use in their life. Anyone can be "A.R.T.". My goal is to stand for something that's bigger than me, to be a symbol that can inspire, entertain people for years to come.  I think the way I approach records as far as content, song structure, or even visuals is always from a creative/artistic approach. I feel for the most part, that is severely lacking in the business. There are a lot of great artists working to restore it; I guess I just want to do my part.”

Recently, rapper Lupe Fiasco challenged the use of the word Bitch in his song and video for “Bitch Bad”, as part of everyday vernacular amongst Black women. Some felt that Lupe was being belittling and exerting patriarchal views on what he deems to be proper femininity.  Lupe also voiced his disdain for the current White House administration, accusing the POTUS of being a terrorist and suggesting that he doesn’t exercise his right to vote, opening him up to scrutiny in the process.  A.R.T. expressed that he’s equally as fearless about voicing his opinion on politics and social justice…
Music is the universal language that everyone can understand, so I like to use it as a plateau to shed light on things that aren't spoken about out in the open or are brushed under the rug. I think that's a big portion of the origin of hip hop… the ability to stand up and speak out, but make it cool in a sense. Word.” 
A.R.T.  took a more philosophical approach, when expressing his opinion about the polarizing effects of the words Bitch and N*gga, which, while challenged by Lupe - (and most recently, Kanye West, during a moment of sanctimoniousness)-  are constants in rap culture…
“I think it's a two sided issue. I don't think it's as black and white as people see it. A lot of people are raised to use those words as terms of endearment. But even with that said, you cannot forget the roots they were derived from. It all comes down the connotation it’s used in. Hip Hop is all about embracing the culture and way of life. And in the culture it can be used both as a term of endearment or a sharp blade of disrespect. I think artists should take ownership of their use of the words and be able to back it up!”
Looking forward to someday working with the likes of DJ Premier, Q-Tip, Swift D, Nas, Jay-Z, Common, Lupe Fiasco, and Kendrick Lamar, A.R.T. is slated to release a highly conceptual idea that will include visual art and merchandising endeavors, and he's primed and ready for his breakthrough in the Connecticut rap scene and beyond...
I've come across a lot of great artists that I feel, if given the right opportunity, they can do extremely well and represent for the state [of Connecticut]  in the most respectable and amazing way! I think in the end, my niche will be for anyone who wants to take away a feeling, new or challenged perspective, or the full package of an artist that truly gives you all of them. I'm the type of artist that would rather have 1000 people that truly rock with me rather than 10,000 that just know my name.”  
Having just wrapped up an end of the season, Summer Series with producer, Beat Wiz, in which he released new material every Friday during the month of August, A.R.T.  has now shifted his focus on putting the final touches on his long awaited pièce de résistance, "I Hate Rappers”, which he's extremely excited for folks to hear, as he believes it will resonate with many people, and will feature the single, “Apocalypse Flow”, which A.R.T. considers to be his most profound track. The project is slated to include a short film, which will accompany the first single, and is scheduled for release this coming October 26.  “I Hate Rappers” will feature production from Dirty Joker and Prestige, with visuals shot by Howard Marsh. “You def want to be on the lookout for that!” A.R.T. advises enthusiastically.

For more information about A.R.T., peruse his website ARTMUSEUM1985.COM , visit his YouTube channel, or connect with him on Facebook and Twitter.